Closing Plenary

University Center at Adelphi

International Interdisciplinary Conference on Clinical Supervision

Friday, June 16, 2017

Assessment of Supervisee Competence by Supervisors: Progress, Pitfalls and Promises

The recent rise of competency-based pedagogies have triggered a cascade of major changes to the discipline of clinical supervision. These changes have swept across the globe, enveloped both supervisor and supervisee, and affected all aspects of supervision: its objectives, methods, assessment and evaluation. The scrutiny of supervision under the lens of a new paradigm has contributed to significant advances in some areas and revealed major lacuna in others, particularly in the supervisor’s assessment of supervisee competence. The address will summarize the scientific literature on the topic, identify critical assessment-of-competence issues, discuss dilemmas and challenges, suggest possible solutions and outline opportunities for innovation and research. Finally, the address will critique the paradigm itself, outlining its potential promises and pitfalls.

Learning Objectives:
  1. Participants will be able to articulate key features of competency-based models of clinical supervision and list important challenges to competency assessment  
  2. Participants will be able to articulate best practice guidelines governing competency assessment in clinical supervision.

Craig Gonsalvez, Ph.D.

Craig Gonsalvez, Ph.D., is Professor of Clinical Psychology, at the School of Social Sciences and Psychology, University of Western Sydney, Australia. He has considerable experience as a clinical psychologist, supervisor, and academic. He has been actively involved in education and training of psychologists for over 20 years, has served as Chair of Course Approvals for the Clinical College of the Australian Psychological Society (2005-2010), and has received several awards and for his contributions to practitioner training and clinical supervision, including the Australian Psychological Society’s Award of Distinction for contributions to Clinical Psychology in 2009, a commission to lead a team to design a new curriculum for supervisor training in Australia by the Australian Psychological Society, and an Australian Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning, for “Enhancing Placement Outcomes and Experiences for Psychology Students Through Competency-Based Supervision, Training and Assessment,” in 2016. His research interests are mainly in two fields: clinical psychophysiology and professional training in psychology, and has published widely on both topics. 

 

For further information, please contact:

School of Social Work
p – 516.877.4300